Oil paintings, Fine art, Maritime Art Greenwich

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Admiral Sir Cloudesley Shovell, 1650-1707

BHC3026
Oil paintings

Object connections:

Collection Oil paintings, Fine art, Maritime Art Greenwich
Gallery locationNot on display
PeopleDepiction: Shovell, Cloudesley

Object details:

Object ID BHC3026
Description Full-length portrait of Sir Cloudesley Shovell, Admiral of the Fleet, leaning to the right and facing slightly to the left, wearing three-quarter length armour and a full-bottomed wig. He is leaning on a cannon which is probably draped with a blue flag, and in his left hand he holds a combined telescope and baton. In the right background, his flagship is shown in action, blue at the main. In the War of the Spanish Succession, he brought home the silver captured by Sir George Rooke at Vigo in 1702. Returning home from an attack on Toulon in 1707, in his flagship 'Association', he was lost with 800 or 900 men when his ship was wrecked off the Isles of Scilly. The Swedish painter travelled to London in 1682 where he became acquainted with Godfrey Kneller. In 1685, he left for Europe and returned to London in 1689 where he remained. During Dahl's absence, Kneller consolidated his supremacy as the fashionable portrait painter, although the prolific Dahl was his closest competitor. Politically, Kneller supported the ascendant Whigs, while Dahl was a Tory. The death of Kneller in 1723 left Dahl the principal London portraitist. The painting has been signed by the artist and is dated 1702.
Date made 1702

Artist/Maker Dahl, Michael
Credit National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London. Caird Fund.
Materials oil on canvas
Measurements Painting: 2387 x 1473 mm; Frame: 2615 x 1670 x 105 mm
Parts
  • Admiral Sir Cloudesley Shovell, 1650-1707 (BHC3026)
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