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Tarbat Ness Light

NAV0977

Object connections:

Collection
Gallery locationNeptune Court (Floor plans)
Publication(s)The National Maritime Museum - The Collections
Fletcher
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Object details:

Object ID NAV0977
Description This light is the one designed by the N.L.B. Chief Engineer D.A. Stevenson in 1891. The glass lenses were made by Barbier & Co Paris, whilst James Dove, Edinburgh produced the mechanism. The loss of sixteen vessels in the Moray Firth storm of November 1826 brought many applications for lights on Tarbat Ness or Covesea Skerries. The former was given priority as it had been named in 1814 and was regarded as important by the Caledonian Canal Commissioners. The Tarbat Ness Lighthouse was engineered by Robert Stevenson and built by James Smith of Inverness. The light was first exhibited on 26 January 1830. The tower (41 m, with 203 steps) is the third tallest in Scotland (after North Ronaldsay and Skerryvore being taller) and bears two distinguishing broad red bands. The total elevation is 53 m and nominal range 24 miles, flashing (4) white every 30 secs. The light was an Argand Paraffin Lamp with 4 burners until 1907 when it was changed to an incandescent pressurised lamp with 55 mm mantles. The optic and lightroom machine now in the Museum were installed in 1892 and remained in use until automation in 1985.
Date made 1891

Artist/Maker Barbier
Stevenson, D A
Dove, James, & Co
Place made Paris, France
Credit National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London
Materials metal; inorganic: glass
Parts
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