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HMS Staunch (1867); Warship; Gunboat; Steam flatiron type

SLR0097
Ship models

Object connections:

Collection Ship models, Powered warships
Gallery locationNot on display
VesselsStaunch 1867
Publication(s)Ship models : their purpose and development from 1650 to the present : illustrated from the ship model collection of the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich

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Object details:

Object ID SLR0097
Description Scale: 1:48. A contemporary full hull model of ‘Staunch’ (1867), a flatiron-type steam gunboat. Built in ‘bread and butter’ construction the model is decked and equipped, including the rigging to enable the demonstration of the large gun mounted on a slide in the bow. Built by Armstrong at Newcastle-on-Tyne in 1867, the ‘Staunch’ measured 75 feet in length by 25 feet in the beam and a tonnage of 200 burden. It was one of a large class of iron twin-screw gunboats built for coastal and harbour defence and due to their rather ‘tubby’ hull shape, they became known as ‘flatirons’. Latterly a number of these vessels were used as tenders and gunnery trials ships. A single 9-inch muzzle-loading gun was mounted behind iron-hinged shields which could be lowered during calm weather. The gun was mounted on the standard slide carriage and the ammunition was stowed in shell racks on the deck. The ‘Staunch’ was eventually sold for breaking in 1904 whilst the last survivor of the class was finally broken up in 1959.
Date made Circa 1867

Credit National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London.
Materials brass; cotton; paint; stain; varnish; wood
Measurements Overall model: 230 x 756 x 170 mm; Support: 72 x 25 mm; Baseboard: 35 x 870 x 243 mm
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  • HMS Staunch (1867); Warship; Gunboat; Steam flatiron type (SLR0097)
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