Ship models, Dockyards, buildings, and topography

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Pool of London, c. 1780

SLR2161
Ship models

Object connections:

Collection Ship models, Dockyards, buildings, and topography
Gallery locationMaritime London Gallery (Floor plans)
PeopleMaker: Britten, Kenneth
Publication(s)Ship models : their purpose and development from 1650 to the present : illustrated from the ship model collection of the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich

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Object details:

Object ID SLR2161
Description Scale: 1:1300. A scenic topographical model depicting cargo handling in the Port of London, River Thames (circa 1780) made entirely in wood with metal and synthetic fittings and painted in realistic colours. The model shows the port with the old London Bridge, with its houses and shops, marking the upper limit of navigation for the ships, as well as other well-known landmarks such as the Monument, the Tower of London and the Custom House. The vernacular building s on the north and south bank have been mostly painted in a restricted pallet of colours of browns and brick reds. The water is painted a uniform light grey with the tide falling as shown by the swell on the downstream side of London Bridge. A large number of sailing cargo ships are depicted moored mostly in rows in mid-river. The Tower of London has a large green open area encompassing the outer walls. Within the walls the white tower is distinctive.
Date made circa 1978

Artist/Maker Britten, Kenneth
Place made Bolehill, Derbyshire, England
Credit National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London. Reproduced with kind permission of Kenneth Britten, modelmaker
Materials cotton; laminate; metal; paint; paper; plastic; wood
Measurements Overall model: 95 x 950 x 599 mm
Parts
  • Pool of London, c. 1780 (SLR2161)
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